Join us to engage in lively conversations over refreshments. This fun event intended for adults and seniors who are looking to socialize and make new friends.

For information call 519-255-6770, Ext. 5400.

Friday, February 15, and 22, from 10:30 am to 11:30 am, Forest Glade Library.

 

Do you want to express
your creative side with art
while meeting new people?
Join us at the Central Branch on select Saturdays to learn the craft of collage making.

February 23, March 9, 23, April 6 and May 4, from 10:30 am to 11:30 a.m.

All supplies will be provided.
For more information contact Colleen at 519.255.6770, Extension 4434

Build, Make, Create and
Play! Join us for activities in
the Children’s Learning Centre. For ages 6 – 12 years.

Every Saturday at 1:30 pm, Children’s Learning Centre, Central Library.

Learn about the digestive system and what role it
plays in your health, beyond just absorbing nutrients.

Join us for another event of our New Year, New You series with Dr. Harrison Oake, ND.

For information, call 519-255-6770 ext. 4434.

Saturday, February 23, from 2:00 pm, Chisholm Library.

Windsor Public Library is pleased to offer a new
source of streaming films.

Kanopy at http://windsor.kanopy.com showcases more than 30,000 of the world’s best films, including award-winning documentaries, rare and hard-to-find titles, film festival favorites, indie and classic films, and world cinema.

Join us for another event
of our New Year, New You series, and learn about hormones in the body and what they regulate.

Dr. Harrison Oake, ND will show you how to identify hormone imbalances and how to get them back on track.

For information, call 519-255-6770 ext. 4434.

Saturday, March 2, from 2:00 pm, Riverside Library.

Do you know someone
who struggles with everyday emotions or do you find yourself feeling overwhelmed easily.

Join us for another event
of our New Year, New You series, and learn with Dr. Harrison Oake, ND, simple and effective ways you can use essential oils for emotional aromatherapy in your home.

For information, call 519-255-6770 ext. 4434.

Wednesday, March 20, from 7:00 pm, Riverside Library.

FAMILY DAY

All locations of the Windsor Public Library will be closed on Monday, February 18, 2019 in recognition of FAMILY DAY.  Regular hours resume on Tuesday, February 19, 2019....
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THROWBACK THURSDAY

The John Richardson Public Library is this week’s Throwback Thursday Pic. The library was opened in November 1928 to the public at 1495 Wyandotte Street West. In 1968 the Adie Knox Herman Complex was constructed as an addition to the library. The library served the west end of the city until 1973, when Ambassador Library opened. Today, the building that housed the John Richardson Library still stands as part of the Adie Knox Herman Complex. If you are interested in this or other historic photographs of Continue Reading...
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Free Access To More Than 30,000 Movies

The popular on-demand film streaming service KANOPY is now available free of charge at Windsor Public Library. Card holders can access Kanopy and sign up to start streaming films instantly by visiting windsor.kanopy.com. Films can be streamed from any computer, television, mobile device or platform by downloading the Kanopy app for iOS, Android, AppleTV, Chromecast or Roku. Offering what the New York Times calls “a garden of cinematic delights,” Kanopy showcases more than 30,000 of the world’s best films, including award-winning documentaries, rare and hard-to-find titles, film festival favorites, Continue Reading...
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Throwback Thursday

This week’s Throwback Thursday pic is of the Sandwich Canal. Taken in the early 1910s by Andrew Bowlby. This is part of an extensive photograph collection from the Bowlby family that is housed at the Community Archives located at the Windsor Public Library’s Central Branch. If you would like to view additional historic photographs of Windsor, please visit the library’s digital exhibit “Windsor’s History and Pictures” at http://heritage.windsorpubliclibrary.com/....
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Throwback Thursday

Before the age of mechanical refrigeration, households would keep their meats and vegetables cool in an icebox. The icebox got its name from the block of ice that was housed in a compartment locate at the top. The ice would slowly melt into a tray underneath that would need to be empty on a regular interval. The ice was delivered to your house by an iceman who would visit a couple of times a week. The blocks of ice came from people who would go out Continue Reading...
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